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How the gut microbiome may predict Alzheimer’s disease

Jul 30, 2023

Gut microbiome composition may serve as an early indicator of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD). By comparing the gut microbial profiles in cognitively normal individuals, researchers identified specific bacterial taxa associated with early preclinical AD, potentially enhancing our understanding of AD etiology and risk prediction.

 

Key takeaways: Gut microbiome composition may be an indicator of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease

 

  • Early detection of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): The gut microbiome composition may serve as an early indicator of preclinical AD, allowing for potential early intervention and management
  • Connection between gut health and cognitive function: The study emphasises the relationship between gut health and cognitive function, suggesting that maintaining a healthy gut microbiome could be vital in preventing or slowing down neurodegenerative diseases like AD
  • Potential for personalised medicine: The identification of specific gut bacterial taxa associated with preclinical AD opens doors for personalised medicine, where individualised treatments and preventive measures could be developed based on one’s gut microbiome
  • Enhanced understanding of AD etiology: The correlation between gut microbiome changes and AD biomarkers enhances our understanding of the disease’s underlying mechanisms, possibly leading to new therapeutic approaches

Reference: Snodgrass RG, Jiang X, Stephensen CB, Laugero KD. Cumulative physiological stress is associated with age-related changes to peripheral T lymphocyte subsets in healthy humans. Immun Ageing. 2023 Jun 23;20(1):29. doi: 10.1186/s12979-023-00357-5. PMID: 37353855; PMCID: PMC10288764.