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Inflammaging: the silent driver of age-related diseases

Jun 30, 2023

A recent study explored the updated hallmarks of ageing, emphasising the role of chronic inflammation, termed “inflammaging.” This low-grade inflammation, prevalent during ageing without apparent infection, is linked to higher morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The research highlights the cyclical relationship between chronic inflammation and age-related conditions like cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, and cancer.

 

Key takeaways: Chronic inflammation and the hallmarks of aging

 

  • Inflammaging as a central factor: “Inflammaging” refers to the persistent, low-grade chronic inflammation observed during ageing, even without overt infection. This phenomenon is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in the ageing population
  • Bidirectional relationship with age-related conditions: Chronic inflammation is not only a hallmark but also interacts cyclically with other age-related conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, and cancer. The relationship between chronic inflammation and other ageing hallmarks is bidirectional and cyclical, meaning they influence each other in a loop that can exacerbate ageing and related diseases
  • Interplay with other ageing hallmarks: The study integrates the mechanisms of chronic inflammation with other recognised hallmarks of ageing, providing a comprehensive view of how inflammation intertwines with cellular and molecular ageing processes.  Special attention is given to “altered nutrient sensing” as it relates to molecular metabolism and its deregulation during ageing, which disrupts the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signalling

 

Reference: Baechle, J. J., Chen, N., Makhijani, P., Winer, S., Furman, D., & Winer, D. A. (2023). Chronic inflammation and the hallmarks of aging. Molecular Metabolism, 74, 101755. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2023.101755